An Update on the Charters

Happy New Year to everyone!

We recently published an updated Planning Enforcement Charter which explains the Council’s approach to investigating potential breaches of planning control. The enforcement charter is updated every two years and was recently reviewed by Committee in early December to outline the key changes.

The Charter provides useful information on what a breach of planning control is, how to report potential breaches to the Council, how we will carry out investigations, and what the possible outcomes of an investigation might be. The Charter also explains that the purpose of planning enforcement is to try and resolve breaches and mitigate any harm being caused, however, if a breach cannot be resolved through negotiation the Council may take formal action and in the most serious cases this can lead to fines or prosecution. The enforcement investigation process is summarised in the flowchart below.

Members of the public have an important role in bringing potential breaches to our attention and this is reflected in the high number of enquiries we receive each year. When reporting a potential breach it is important to provide as much information as possible. This can include copies of any relevant photographs and should include a description of how you are affected by the breach – your identity will not be disclosed during the course an investigation.

As explained in the Charter, it may not be proportionate or necessary to pursue minor breaches where there are no unacceptable impacts, and enquiries which involve listed buildings and conservation areas, short term lets, protected trees and serious harm to residential amenity will be a priority for the enforcement team.

We hope you find the Charter useful and informative. Further information on how to report a potential breach is available on the Council website and you can view enforcement enquiry records via the planning portal.

To visit our planning and building standards charters, please click here.

End of year Planning Edinburgh blog

As we approach the end of 2021, we’ve reflected on what has been another eventful year for planning in Edinburgh.

As a service we were as busy as ever with large numbers of planning applications coming through the virtual door and significant planning projects continuing apace.

Earlier in the year we had some staff retire, and with recruitment underway we’re looking forward to welcoming new team members. We’re also delighted that David Givan has now been appointed as the Chief Planning Officer here at the Council.

Key projects have made significant progress with the proposed City Plan 2030 approved in September. The period of representation has now concluded as we move to the next stage in the process.

Consultation has been another key theme, not just on City Plan 2030, but also the low emission zone, short term lets control areas, and the proposed extension to Leith conservation area.

Major applications such as the Impact Centre concert hall, the New Town Quarter, Edinburgh Park South, developments at the waterfront and various housing sites across the city have all been approved.

It’s heartening to see new development on the ground, in what has been another challenging year for the industry, with new buildings being recognised through local award schemes.  The opening of the new St. James Quarter and commencement of work at Haymarket is testament to years of effort by the service, our partners and the communities who engaged in the various stages of planning.

Day-to-day our householders, locals and listed buildings teams have kept the smaller, but often no less complex developments moving, helping to support local businesses and the construction sector. With people often choosing to adapt their home rather than move, we’ve seen a lot of activity in that area.

Change and development can on occasion have some unintended consequences and the planning enforcement team have been following up on cases including any unauthorised planning uses.

Applications for work to trees has also been busy, and with a new member of staff joining the team we’ve been working through these applications whilst making improvements to the submission process.

COP26 brought into sharp focus the issue of climate change, and our work on important projects such as Edinburgh’s Water Vision and City Mobility Plan continue to see us embed sustainability at the heart of our policies. We helped to bring to life the SpACE pop up exhibition and got involved in the programme of talks.  Changes to permitted development rights for cycle storage have also been introduced as another way to encourage active travel.

Our heritage, landscaping and transport teams have been supporting the planning applications process and contributing to the preparation of City Plan and policies. Our Street Naming team continue to name new streets and are always looking for suggested names, so get in touch if you have any.

Service improvements are ongoing and have been informed by the customer forums we held this year.  Our pre-application service, non-material variations, online payments and requirements for contextual information are all in place. You can expect to see more improvements in 2022.

And finally, it’s a thanks from us to everyone who uses and interacts with the service for their patience and support as we do our jobs in these unusual times.

Have a great Christmas, and New Year when it comes.

City Plan 2030: Consultation Closed

The 20th of December saw the end of the consultation period for submitting formal representations to the proposed City Plan 2030. 

The Council will now carefully consider the representations received.  Once the Council has completed its deliberations the proposed plan, along with its representations, will be submitted to Scottish Ministers for formal examination.  The indicative time scale for that stage of the plan process is set out in the approved Development Plan Scheme.  

You can find out further information about the City Plan 2030 here: www.edinburgh.gov.uk/cityplan2030

Individual documents, including the plan’s written statement, can be viewed here: City Plan 2030 – background documents – The City of Edinburgh Council

You can keep up to date with the City Plan project by:

  • subscribing to our blog
  • following us on twitter at @planningedin
  • joining in the conversation by using the #cityplan2030 hashtag

City Plan 2030: Consultation Closing Soon

There is less than a week left to make representations on our Proposed Local Development Plan: City Plan 2030 which closes on 20th December 2021.

Representations can be in support of or object to any aspect of the proposed plan and should set out any changes you wish to see. Comments can also be made on the Environmental Report and background documents.

The consultation hub contains the plan in full and you can comment on each section in turn or simply navigate to the part you wish to comment on.

We have prepared a Quick Guide to City Plan 2030 This gives an overview of each section of the plan and what it contains plus more information on the plan and the process. We have also prepared a quick guide to assist you in submitting a representation on the consultation hub.

The proposed plan sets out locations for new homes and businesses, where new infrastructure and facilities are required and how we will protect places of value. It also includes policies which will be used to determine future planning applications and will shape the city over the next 10 years and beyond, while also developing our city for a net-zero future.

Find out more

Visit the City Plan 2030 webpage for details of online public briefing sessions or you can keep up to date with the City Plan project by:

  • subscribing to our blog
  • following us on twitter at @planningedin
  • joining in the conversation by using the #CityPlan2030 hashtag

2021 Edinburgh Architectural Association (EAA) Awards for Architecture

This year’s EAA awards were held on 28th October. According to their website, the awards are ‘designed to create a showcase for the Architectural profession to demonstrate its contribution to the environment and the economy’.

Last November there was a number of Edinburgh schemes among the winners at the 2020 awards.

Here is a quick look at the developments in Edinburgh which were among this year’s winners.

If you want to take a deeper look into the details, the Planning Portal  provides all the plans, drawings and related reports.

Old Schoolhouse, Morningside Rd (Planning Reference 18/01829/FUL)

Small Project Award

(Credit: EAA)

This category B-listed single storey church is located on the north-west corner of Morningside Road and Cuddy Lane and is in the Merchiston and Greenhill Conservation Area. It was originally built as a schoolhouse in 1823 with 20th century extensions to north and south elevations.  An application for Planning Permission was submitted in April 2018 for the demolition and replacement of the existing south extension and the removal of the internal and external alterations to the north extension’s east and west elevations.

View all the drawing, plans & details on the Planning Portal .

Queensferry High School (Planning Reference 17/04262/FUL)

eaa-edinburgh-architectural-association-awards-2021-queensferry-hs-1.jpg
(Credit: EAA)

Large Project Award

An application in September 2017 was submitted for a new build replacement secondary school with associated playing fields, external spaces, car parking and landscaping. The existing school was demolished following completion of the development.

View all the drawing, plans & details on the Planning Portal

Meadowbank Masterplan (Planning Reference 20/00618/AMC)

Masterplanning Award

(Credit: Collective Architecture)

The redevelopment of Meadowbank is a major Council led regeneration project which will deliver a modern sports centre with new homes and community facilities on the surrounding site. This strategic place-making project is expected to bring significant opportunities to the area. 

View all the drawing, plans & details on the Planning Portal.

Other nominated Edinburgh schemes included:

Small Project

69/3 East Claremont Street

1/5 Gordon St

Stockbridge Ghost Extension

CommendationTreen

Residential

Commendation– Gayfield Square (Planning Application Reference 21/02889/CLP)

Large Project

Commendation– St Peter’s Church Hall (Link Phase) (Planning Application Reference 21/03913/LBC)

Masterplannning

Granton Waterfront (Granton Waterfront Development Framework)

Regeneration/Conservation

6 Circus Lane (Planning Application Reference 19/03220/LBC)

Blackhall St Columbia’s Church (Planning Application Reference 18/07853/FUL)

Congratulations to all winners and finalists!