Removing ‘A’ boards from our pavements & reducing clutter

 

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Since November, a citywide ban on ‘A’ boards and other temporary adverts has been in force. This is primarily to improve pedestrian safety and accessibility on our streets. It is part of wider efforts to help create a more welcoming, clutter-free city for everyone.

Environmental Wardens are working closely with businesses and are reporting good results across the city. Businesses have adapted to the ban in a variety of ways, including by incorporating advertising into barriers around tables and chairs (for which they have a licence) or putting a sign on their walls or windows (if allowed).

There are lots of places to go for businesses looking for more information on advertising or guidance to help them through this ongoing change;

As you can see from our photo gallery above, removing A-Boards can help make a huge difference for people with mobility issues getting around Edinburgh. By removing barriers on our pavements, it is hoped that people can move more freely across the city and businesses will feel the benefit from shoppers attracted by better pavements.

If you wish to report any A-Boards which you feel should be looked at by an Environmental Warden, please email us at aboards@edinburgh.gov.uk.

Public Life Street Assessments

A series of studies investigating the public life of Edinburgh’s town centres reveal how each currently functions in terms of pedestrian/cyclist movement and as a place.

Bruntsfield and Morningside
Corstorphine

 

 

Leith Walk
Gorgie and Dalry
Nicolson Street and Clerk Street
Portobello
Stockbridge
Tollcross

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Life Street Assessments, carried out by design consultants HERE+NOW for the Council, involve a mix of direct observation methodologies, user interviews and more focussed sub studies such as facade, land use and activity studies.  In-depth analysis of this data identifies trends in the way people currently use the street environment. This has informed suggested opportunities for improvement.

The assessments supplement the Council’s existing knowledge about how these town centres function and build on existing thinking and work to date, including the Local Development Plan, Town Centre Toolkit and Edinburgh Street Design Guidance.

The studies provide valuable information for all parties with an interest in maximising public life within Edinburgh’s town centres.  They have already informed the preparation of Supplementary Guidance for each of the town centres, draft Locality Improvement Plans and a design and an improved public space trial project within Stockbridge.

Update – using the studies

One of the studies has already informed input to a Locality Improvement Plan (LIP) – the South West LIP includes reference to the Gorgie/Dalry Town Centre which was informed by the relevant study. More detailed work will be under taken to develop to a delivery plan with associated timescales.

The Supplementary Guidance, which are about to be adopted, will be used to determine relevant planning applications.

The studies will also be used as an input to the LDP Action Programme, due to be updated early 2018.  We’ll share the Action Programme here on the blog and on Twitter when it’s out too.

Edinburgh Wayfinding project

The Council along with other key partners is working on delivering a Wayfinding system for Edinburgh, similar to other towns and cities in the UK.  The aim of the project is to encourage walking and the exploration of the City for residents and visitors.

What is a wayfinding system?

A Wayfinding system is a number of mapping products such as digital, printed and on-street maps which help people to orient themselves and navigate from place to place.  The idea is to make getting around the city as simple as possible.

Clear and consistent mapping forms the basis of any Wayfinding product and the Council has been working to create a bespoke digital map that reflects Edinburgh’s unique identity and highlights walking times, footpaths, accessible routes, travel information and key areas and places throughout the City.

The wayfinding project

The project is at the design stage and the map of Edinburgh will be completed by the end of September 2017.

We hope that the project will provide the city with a mapping resource to create a range of Wayfinding products: printed maps, on-street information (including bus shelters and tram stops) as well as on-line to make getting around the city even easier, to encourage walking and to help people to explore the city.  The mapping resource is royalty-free so can be used and adapted by others to help improve the information we have and for  communities to map and promote their own area.

What happens next?

The next phase of the work is to identify funding and partner projects.  We’ll be working on this in the coming months and will keep you up to date here on the blog.

If you’d like to know more about the project, get in touch with the project manager Anna Grant at anna.grant@edinburgh.gov.uk

Example of a wayfinding map

Southside Place Standard Online Survey

Hello All,

Last week (22nd and 26th November) we ran a couple of Place Standard events at Southside Community Centre. The events were generally well attended, with some really good feedback from both sessions.

Following on from these events, we are now running a short online survey using the questions from the Place Standard tool, which, if you live, work or spend time in the Southside, we would love it if you could spare 5 -10 minutes to complete it.

Just a reminder of what the Place Standard is, it is a tool to evaluate the quality of a place. There are 14 questions which cover the social and physical elements of a place. Each question is given a score out of 7 based on what people think and feel, 7 being excellent and 1 being poor.

The results of the events and the online survey will help to inform future policies and change in the area, so it is vitally important that you have your say on what needs to be improved.

The Southside
The Southside

Thank you in advance for taking time out to complete the survey.

George.

The Southside Place Standard

Hello,

The Southside Placemaking Exercise

The City of Edinburgh Council in partnership with various organisations from the Southside, will be holding a Placemaking exercise to get your views on what you think works well and what doesn’t work so well in the Southside.

southside-image
The Southside

How to get involved

We will be carrying out a placemaking exercise using the Place Standard tool which has been developed by A&DS, the Scottish Government and NHS Scotland. We will take groups of people through the exercise in facilitated sessions.  We’d like as many of the community as possible to get involved to help make the process work.

generic-place-wheel
The Place Standard wheel shows how people scored different aspects of their area. 1 being very poor, 7 being excellent. (This is an illustrative example and not the scores for the Southside).

This is the third time we have used this process, so we know it is a successful tool.  It will help inform the Town Centre Supplementary Guidance and the Southside Locality Improvement Plan.

When

Tuesday 22nd November

  • 1st Session 17:30
  • 2nd Session 18:45

Saturday 26th November

  • 1st Session 10:00
  • 2nd Session 11:00

Where

Southside Community Centre

Please let us know if you’re interested in coming along to one of the sessions by contacting george.oldroyd@edinburgh.gov.uk

What is Placemaking?

Places that work well for the community have a significant influence on the health and well-being of individuals. The opposite is also true – places that do not work well have a negative impact on health and well-being. The aim of placemaking is to create successful places.

We can measure the success of a place through the use of a tool called the Place Standard . This consists of a series of indicators that allow the community to assess things like access to greenspace, general maintenance of an area and perception of safety. This tells us where a place is succeeding and where it is failing.

The Scottish Government’s policy on Architecture and Place – Creating Places sets the context for how we can deliver great places.

What will happen after the exercise?

This process will give us lots of information about the Southside and how it works well as a town and where it doesn’t and we can use this to inform what we do as a Council and how new development can support the qualities of the Southside.

This is not just another consultation, it is an opportunity to make a difference to the area in which you live, work and visit.

Information regarding these events is also  available on the City of Edinburgh Council’s consultation hub.