City Plan 2030 – Housing Land Audit and Completions Programme 2020

Housing under construction at Fountainbridge (January 2021)

The Housing Land Audit and Completions Programme (HLACP) is used to assess the supply of land for housing and delivery of new homes. It records the amount of land available for house building, identifies any constraints affecting development and assesses the land supply against the housing supply target and housing land requirement set by the Strategic Development Plan.

As part of these efforts, we have published our annual Housing Land Audit and Completions Programme for 2020. Special thanks to Homes for Scotland and their members, who have provided invaluable input to the audit despite the challenges faced by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The short video below gives an overview of where we are in terms of land availability and housing completions in Edinburgh.

You can also view the Housing Land Audit and Completions data on our online GIS Atlas , by selecting the Housing Land Audit schedule and Housing Land Audit completions tab in the Planning layer. This can be accessed through the Layer List icon in the top right-hand corner of the Atlas.

The Programme demonstrates that there is more than enough unconstrained housing land to meet the housing land requirements. The key findings from the study are the number of completions recorded for 2019/20 (at nearly 3,000 new homes) is the highest recorded since the late 1990s and the second highest ever recorded. The current effective supply of land is sufficient for 22,696 new homes, substantially above the target of around 15,000. Completions in 2020/21 are expected to fall as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic but build rates are expected to rise once more. At current build rates, there is sufficient effective land to last for 9 years.

The study supports the trends identified in the 2019 Housing Land Audit and Completions Programme, this will help identify housing sites and where development is directed as well as assist in the drafting of housing policy for City Plan 2030

You can keep up to date with the City Plan Project by:

  • Subscribing to our blog
  • following us on twitter at @planningedin
  • joining in the conversation by using the #cityplan2030 hashtag.

City Plan 2030 – Consultation and Timetable Update

We are preparing a new Local Development Plan for Edinburgh called City Plan 2030.  

A new Development Plan Scheme setting out how we prepare a development plan and outlining the proposed timetable to take City Plan 2030 to the Proposed Plan stage has been approved by as part of an update report on City Plan 2030 to committee on 10 March 2021. 

The proposed plan was due to be considered by the Planning Committee this month, but due to the significant cyberattack on the Scottish Environment Protection Agency just before Christmas, the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment required to support the proposed plan was delayed.

It is now expected that the proposed plan will be published in August 2021.

The next stage of the plan process will be the ‘Period of Representations’ which will give a further opportunity for comments to be made on the plan.

How we engage with interested groups and members of the public will be determined by the coronavirus government guidance at the time. As well as a comprehensive digital plan, we will make every effort to engage with those who don’t have access to or prefer not to use digital channels. Further details on this will be published along with the Plan.

You can keep up to date with the City Plan Project by

  • subscribing to our blog
  • following us on twitter at @planningedin
  • joining in the conversation by using the #cityplan2030 hashtag.

Changes Coming Soon to Planning

As part of our efforts to improve our service and adapt for the future, there are two changes to the Planning Service coming soon:

Pre-Application Advice Service

At its meeting in February 2021, Planning Committee approved minor changes to our Pre-Application Advice Service.

It was recognised that the service is working well since it was introduced in 2019, but experience has highlighted the need for an additional option for a site visit for local developments. This will be available from 1 April 2021.

The Planning Committee also agreed a 5% increase in all Pre-Application Advice Service charges received on or after 1 April 2021, in line with the Council’s budget projections for 2021/2022.

Non-Material Variation Applications

At its meeting in February 2021, Planning Committee also agreed to additional discretionary charges for the processing of Non-Material Variation applications.

This will improve customer service and consistency across the service.

Details regarding procedures are being finalised in advance going live on 1 April 2021, but it is anticipated that Non-Material Variation applications will be required to be submitted using a standardised form, accompanied by the relevant drawings and the appropriate fee.  

This process will only apply to granted planning applications and will not be applicable to Listed Building Consents, Conservation Area Consents or Advert Consents.

Full details can be found in the Planning Committee report. Further communications regarding both of these matters will be published in advance of the changes commencing on 1 April 2021.

Edinburgh’s Water Vision

Climate change is going to impact on our lives in more ways than we can even imagine. In response to this, new developments and existing buildings in Edinburgh will have to change in order to support the needs of people. We will also need to consider how public realm, open space, infrastructure and streets are designed, agreed, constructed and maintained.

One of the ways we are preparing Edinburgh for these changes is through our Vision for Management of Water in the City of Edinburgh.

Edinburgh’s Water Vision is;

To develop a long-term and sustainable approach to river, coastal and storm water management across the city and its environs, respecting our unique historic heritage. This will involve all stakeholders and address the flooding and water quality risks associated with our changing climate as a result of changes in rainfall and sea level rise.

One key aim of the report is the need to manage the first 5mm of rainfall within every new development plot.

This is a big change for both planning and building standards, and will require building more raingardens, green roofs and other sustainable urban drainage features.

This will help more plants and wildlife to grow and create greener places for people to live, work and visit. It will also support healthier, happier and better off communities.

A greener city will make our neighbourhoods cooler, helping them become more resilient to heatwaves. This is important as our changing climate means extreme weather events like heatwaves are expected to increase.

Improving drainage

Much of Edinburgh has a historic combined sewer network. This means it carries both sewage and surface water to treatment works.

Our Vision for Management of Water will reduce the amount of clean surface water within the sewer network. This will help cut sewer flooding during heavy rainfall.

We also have a range of  Planning Flood guidance available to help. This will help people to design landscapes which, as well as holding back water to reduce flooding, will encourage plants and wildlife to grow.

As well as making these places nicer to spend time in, plants and wildlife will help to naturally clean rainwater before it reaches our rivers and streams.

This new way of working will enable the development of a city that is adaptive and resilient to climate change, that is also beautiful and biodiverse delivering a healthier, thriving and compact city with a higher quality of life for all residents.

The idea is to deliver transformational change in the way that water is valued and managed in the city.

Contextual Plans

Due to the current Covid restrictions, planning officers are unable to undertake site visits.

However, it is important for everybody that we keep assessing and determining planning applications.

If you are submitting a planning application, it would be extremely helpful to us if you could provide photographs and relevant contextual plans as part of your submission. This information will be requested but it would help the assessment process go faster if they are provided at the start. Photographs do not need to be made publicly available.  

As always, we have a wide range of planning guidance available on our website.

For more information about how the current restrictions are affecting our service, see the Planning and Building Standards coronavirus update.