Scottish Planning Fees Change 1 April 2022

Fees for planning applications set by the Scottish Government change today for almost all application types.

This means everything submitted to us from today onwards is affected, including:

  • ‘full’ planning permission
  • planning permission in principle
  • certificates of lawfulness
  • advertisement consent

Amongst the changes, standard ‘householder’ fees increase from £202 to £300, whilst the standard fee for construction of a new dwelling increases from £401 to £600.

Details of the changes are set out by The Town and Country Planning (Fees for Applications) (Scotland) Regulations 2022.

Using the ePlanning.scot Fee Calculator is the easiest way to calculate a fee, and can be used without having to log in or to submit an application.

Once you know your correct fee, paying is also easy, and can be done whilst submitting your application on ePlanning.scot.

For those applicants or agents who need to make an additional payment, or for applicants who may wish to pay after their agent has submitted, you can also pay for your planning application online using this link (for a quick guide to using this payment system, have a look at this blog post from November 2020.)

In addition, fees for pre-application advice are changing on 1 April – details can be found here.

Some other fees related to Planning & Building Standards change today, including;

Scottish Planning Fees Set to Change 1 April 2022

Fees for planning applications set by the Scottish Government change on 1 April 2022 for almost all application types. This means everything submitted to us on or after 1 April 2022 will be affected including:

  • ‘full’ planning permission
  • planning permission in principle
  • certificates of lawfulness
  • advertisement consent

Amongst the changes, the standard ‘householder’ fee increases from £202 to £300, whilst the standard fee for the construction of one new house increases from £401 to £600.

Details of the changes including information on concessions are set out by The Town and Country Planning (Fees for Applications) (Scotland) Regulations 2022.

Making sure that you calculate your fee correctly will make the validation process quicker and will help avoid delays with your application.  

Once you know your correct fee, paying is also easy, and can be done whilst submitting your application using ePlanning.scot.  

Some other fees related to Planning & Building Standards are also changing on 1 April 2022, including;

What’s in a street name?

We rely on addresses every day.  Whether it’s registering to vote, ordering something online, visiting a place you’ve never been before or just getting a takeaway delivered, a unique address is essential.

Edinburgh street names
Edinburgh street names

The Council is responsible for issuing addresses to all properties within its boundary.  To assist in doing this, the Street Naming Team has a name bank for each of the Neighbourhood Partnership areas which contain potential names to be used for new developments.  We encourage people to suggest potential street names, usually via their Neighbourhood Partnership or local Councillors.  However, we are currently carrying out a consultation on new street names and would appreciate any suggestions.

The Street Naming team’s primary consideration when issuing new addresses is public safety as, in an emergency, it is important that a specific address can be identified quickly and easily.  For this reason we no longer duplicate street names with different suffixes (such as Eyre Place and Eyre Crescent) due to the potential for confusion.

Generally, street names are selected that commemorate people, places or events connected to the city, with a view to preserving local history and reinforcing our sense of place. Potential names should meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • commemorate local history, places, events or culture, and in particular any that relate to the site
  • honour and commemorate noteworthy persons associated with the local area, or the City of Edinburgh as a whole
  • celebrate cultural diversity in the City of Edinburgh
  • commemorate national and international noteworthy persons, who have been deceased for five years or more
  • commemorate national and international events
  • strengthen neighbourhood identity
  • recognise native wildlife, flora, fauna or natural features related to the community or the city as a whole.

If you would like to propose street names, you can do this using the Consultation Hub.

Baron Maules Close
Baron Maule’s Close (refurbished sign)

Old Infirmary Lane
Old Infirmary Lane (a recently repainted sign)

Lang Rigg - new street name plates in South Queensferry are blue with white lettering
Lang Rigg – new street name plates in South Queensferry are blue with white lettering